Phentermine Scientific Formula

Phentermine is a diet pill that gained popularity during its ill fated

Phentermine hydrochloride USP has the chemical name of α-Dimethylphenethylamine hydrochloride. For those interested here is the structural formula:phentermine formula

Phentermine hydrochloride is a white, odorless, hygroscopic, crystalline powder which is soluble in water and lower alcohols, slightly soluble in chloroform and insoluble in ether.

Phentermine hydrochloride, an anorectic agent for oral administration, is available as a tablet or capsule containing 37.5 mg of phentermine hydrochloride (equivalent to 30 mg of phentermine base). Different companies use different ingredients in their formulas Mutual Pharmaceutical Co., Inc. ingredients – Phentermine hydrochloride tablets contain the inactive ingredients: crospovidone, dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, magnesium stearate, povidone, propylene glycol, FD and C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake, shellac glaze, and titanium dioxide. KVK-TECH INC. ingredients – Phentermine hydrochloride tablets contain the inactive ingredients: corn starch, FD and C Blue #1, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, pharmaceutical glaze, stearate acid, and sucrose.

Phentermine hydrochloride capsules contain the inactive ingredients: corn starch, D and C Red #33, FD and C Blue #1, gelatin, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, and titanium dioxide.

General Information

Phentermine hydrochloride is a sympathomimetic amine with pharmacologic activity similar to the prototype drugs of this class used in obesity, the amphetamines. Actions include central nervous system stimulation and elevation of blood pressure. Tachyphylaxis and tolerance have been demonstrated with all drugs of this class in which these phenomena have been looked for.

Drugs of this class used in obesity are commonly known as “anorectics” or “anorexigenics”. It has not been established that the action of such drugs in treating obesity is primarily one of appetite suppression. Other central nervous system actions, or metabolic effects, may be involved, for example.

Adult obese subjects instructed in dietary management and treated with “anorectic” drugs, lose more weight on the average than those treated with placebo and diet, as determined in relatively short-term clinical trials.

The magnitude of increased weight loss of drug-treated patients over placebo-treated patients is only a fraction of a pound a week. The rate of weight loss is greatest in the first weeks of therapy for both drug and placebo subjects and tends to decrease in succeeding weeks. The possible origins of the increased weight loss due to the various drug effects are not established. The amount of weight loss associated with the use of an “anorectic” drug varies from trial to trial, and the increased weight loss appears to be related in part to variables other than the drugs prescribed, such as the physician-investigator; the population treated and the diet prescribed. Studies do not permit conclusions as to the relative importance of the drug and non-drug factors on weight loss.

You may also like...